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February 2014
Sperm, groceries, and mail: Why bike is best for precious cargo

Sperm, groceries, and mail: Why bike is best for precious cargo

CNN carries the story of CYCLE LOGISTICS By Daisy Carrington, on February 12, 2014
Features Project Partners Rob King from OUTSPOKEN, Randy Rzewnicki from ECF and photos by Mikael Collville-Andersen from Copenhagenize



(CNN) -- As any bike lover can attest, cycling has numerous advantages over driving; it's cheaper, healthier, and when there's traffic, the ride can be considerably quicker. What cars bring to the table is storage space. It's difficult to imagine moving house, schlepping groceries or making deliveries by bicycle, but in a handful of cities, residents and businesses are choosing to do just that.

Nine years ago, Rob King launched Outspoken Deliveries, a bicycle courier service in Cambridge, England -- a city often deemed the country's most bike-friendly.

"When we started, there were a few companies in Cambridge doing what we do, but they were still using shoulder bags, and delivering small documents. We found these cargo bikes that operated like a small van, only they were much more flexible and faster," he recalls. Today, his fleet includes bikes that can haul up to 250kg (550 pounds). Last year, Outspoken started subcontracting for larger delivery firms, including Parcelforce, TNT and APC.

"Traveling that last mile or two to deliver a package can be a bit of a headache for delivery companies," explains King. In the EU, larger companies often have to comply with automobile restrictions (in Cambridge, cars can't load or unload in the city center between 10am and 4pm without incurring a fine) and increased taxes for high-emission vehicles. Delivery by bike avoids those pitfalls.

Research undertaken by CycleLogistics, an EU-funded project dedicated to replacing motorized freight transport with bikes, found that bikes and cargo bikes could accommodate 51% of all deliveries in European cities currently being moved by all types of motor vehicles and over 90% of all supermarket shopping trips. According to Austrian Mobility Research, that amounts to a saving of 37 million tons of C02 a year, or a full 1% of Europe's current emissions.

Read the rest of the story here
http://edition.cnn.com/2014/02/12/sport/sperm-groceries-and-mail-bike/index.html?hpt=hp_c5



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